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  Home >> GNC News >> 20170713
 
 Paris Airshow: eight takeaways from the major aerospace event
2017-07-13

 

The event is held every other year - alternating with the Farnborough Airshow - and is a showcase for the world's biggest commercial aviation and defence companies - as well as some plucky upstarts that are not quite household names.

 

Deals worth tens of billions of dollars are done at the show as the hundreds of firms exhibiting their wares pull out all the stops to encourage the top brass from the world's air forces of the world to stop by, as well as wooing slightly less visible customers. For a drone's eye video view of the show click here. Here are eight things we learned from the 52nd Paris Airshow :

Several companies are working on ventures that aim to replicate Concorde's ability to exceed the speed of sound, including Boom Supersonic. The US firm aims to fly a demonstrator by the end of 2018, with the first paying passengers taking to the skies in 2023 - if all goes to plan. That remains a big if, but founder Blake Scholl insists the venture will be "profitable for airlines and affordable for customers".

Slovakia's AeroMobil has its flying car on display. Not just a prototype, the vehicle can be converted into something that takes to the skies in just three minutes. But buyers will have be patient as well as have deep pockets: they can order one of the 500 that will be built as long as they have about $1.5m to spare, and can wait until 2020 for delivery. But even Airbus - one of the world's biggest plane makers - is taking the idea seriously. Jean-Brice Dumont, chief engineer of Airbus helicopters, says the technology for "flying cars" exists, but legal and social barriers remain, and might be trickier to solve. He makes a bullish prediction: there will be flying cars in our garages within 20 years.

 

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